CARSON FISK-VITTORI

I’m looking at a picture of a praying mantis eating a fly it looks so delicious I mean it looks like the praying mantis is eating something so fleshy and fulfilling. I spent hours looking at pictures of people hand pollinating plants. I collected them in a folder on dropbox. Instead of bees or flies or wasps or moths, they are using various tools to pollinate plants by hand. These images seem important. I don’t know much about this topic, I can just assume things from the pictures and the snippets of text. I don’t have any flowers to pollinate. Someone is pollinating a peach blossom with a tuft of dog hair. Others are using toothbrushes and paintbrushes to pollinate potatoes. “It’s not paint it’s pollen.” Many of the hands in the pictures are wearing rings on their ring fingers. Isn’t it weird that Michael Pollan’s last name sounds like pollen?

I’m collecting info about diy insect repellant on Pinterest. Also snake and deer repellant. These recipes seem to indicate the most undesirable fauna. Deers, snakes, mosquitos, spiders. I thought there was another one. Fruit Flies. Should I file this under “DIY”, “Inspiration” or “Materials”?
Spiders – peppermint oil
Mosquitos – rosemary, cinnamon, citronella, clove, bergamot, geranium, lavender, eucalyptus, cedar wood, peppermint, lemongrass, basil, thyme
Almost every unwanted insect I read about doesn’t like peppermint.
Snakes – clove oil, cinnamon oil
Deer – this one looks disgusting – 4 eggs, 1 tbs cayenne, 1 ts black pepper, a couple drops dishwashing detergent, 6 garlic cloves crushed or smashed

Why not just combine all of these to make the ultimate diy unwanted-life-form repellant? I also have recipes for diy perfume. Maybe these folders should be combined. Also “How to make a bamboo bumblebee motel”.

My friend is growing saffron but her plants are sick. Saffron is actually a type of pollen from the crocus flower. Weird. Crocuses are those small flowers that are the first to come up in the spring. There’s usually still snow on the ground. They’re tiny and purple. I love the person who licked the pollen from a crocus for the first time. Wait I just looked it up, its not the pollen it’s the stamens. Crocus sativus. Someone’s holding a small purple flower with dirt all over their hands. There’s another picture of the stamens drying/dying on a paper towel. It’s the most expensive spice in the world.

Carson Fisk-Vittori constructs environments integrating images, artifacts and flora to analyze the complex interactions between humans and the dynamic landscape. “Disturbance Ecology” brings together an ecosystem of hypothetical weather machines, landscaping scenarios, and animal repellants. Carson Fisk-Vittori reveals the devices through which we expe- rience and manipulate our environment, and analyzes our attempts to commodify the natural world.

 

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Exhibition view “Disturbance Ecology” monCHERI, Brussels, Belgium, 2016, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI

 

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Exhibition view “Disturbance Ecology” monCHERI, Brussels, Belgium, 2016, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI

 

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Exhibition view “Disturbance Ecology” monCHERI, Brussels, Belgium, 2016, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI

 

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Exhibition view “Disturbance Ecology” monCHERI, Brussels, Belgium, 2016, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI

 

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Exhibition view “Disturbance Ecology” monCHERI, Brussels, Belgium, 2016, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI

 

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Exhibition view “Disturbance Ecology” monCHERI, Brussels, Belgium, 2016, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI

 

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Carson Fisk-Vittori, “Weather pollination techniques: Someone’s holding a small purple flower with dirt all over their hands” ,2016, UV prints on aluminum, aluminum poles, bamboo, hand-formed plastic, lotus seed pod, clay, flexible tripod, showerhead, metal and plastic hardware and fixtures, velcro, water, 210 x 85 x 85 cm, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI, Brussels.

 

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Carson Fisk-Vittori, “Weather pollination techniques: out of human visible range”, 2016, UV prints on aluminum, aluminum poles, bamboo, hand-formed plastic, lichen covered branch, lotus seed pod, digital camera, flexible tripod, negative ion showerhead, metal and plastic hardware and fixtures, velcro, water, 210 x 85 x 85 cm, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI, Brussels.

 

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Carson Fisk-Vittori, “Weather pollination techniques: the seedling throws up a leaf-bearing stem”, 2016, UV prints on aluminum, aluminum poles, bamboo, hand-formed plastic, tree trunk, grout, moss, clay, liquid compasses, metal and plastic hardware and fixtures, velcro, water, 230 x 100 x 100 cm, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI, Brussels.

 

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Carson Fisk-Vittori, “Weather pollination techniques: eat bugs, save the planet”, 2016 DETAIL, UV print on aluminium, aluminium pole, hand-formed plastic, metal and plastic hardware and fixtures, UV light, velcro. Dimensions variables. © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI, Brussels.

 

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Carson Fisk-Vittori, “Plan for a pond: the social earthworm”,2016 UV prints on aluminum, moss, 156 x 156 cm, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI, Brussels.

 

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Carson Fisk-Vittori, “Thermostat sketch: battery option”, 2016 UV print on aluminum, thorns, 53 x 7 cm, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI, Brussels.

 

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Carson Fisk-Vittori, “Thermostat sketch: air filter option”, 2016 UV print on aluminum, thorns, 66 x 10 cm, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI, Brussels.

 

Ilvy Kokomo @ Studio Itis

Carson Fisk-Vittori, “Thermostat sketch: battery option”, 2016, Aranae : Standing plastic bags, water alcohol, sesame oil, peppermint, basil. Serpentes : Standing plastic bags, water alcohol, sesame oil, cinnamon sticks, cloves. Culicidae : Standing plastic bags, water alcohol, sesame oil, lavendar, 53 x 7 cm, © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI, Brussels.

 

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All images: © Photo: Benoît Cattiaux / Courtesy of the artist and monCHERI

Fisk-Vittori (b. 1987, Austin, TX, USA) lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Since Graduating in 2009 from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago with a BFA in Interdisciplinary Studies, Fisk-Vittori has been included in exhibitions at The Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; Del Vaz Projects, Los Angeles; Galerie Valentin, Paris; Composing Rooms, Berlin; Rod Barton, London; Bodega, Philadelphia; Future Gallery, Berlin; NO Space, Mexico City, and Roots & Culture, Chicago. She has had solo exhibitions at Important Projects, Oakland, and Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago.

 

MONCHÉRI
Carson Fisk-Vittori
March 10th – April 15th, 2016
67 rue de la Régence
1000 Belgium, Brussels