Submission
Olivia Parkes

THE SAME RIVER

Mountains is pleased to announce Olivia Parkes THE SAME RIVER, the artist's first solo exhibition with the gallery. THE SAME RIVER premieres a new body of paintings that deepen the artist's attempt to find a visual language for the circular relationship between representation and reality and the collective sense of anxiety that governs contemporary life. The artist strives for a psychological as well as physical rendering of space and color, pursuing a form of saturated or hallucinatory realism that feels commensurate with the terror, comedy, and mystery of moving through the world.


<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Installation view, Olivia Parkes, THE SAME RIVER, Mountains, Berlin, 2022
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Installation view, Olivia Parkes, THE SAME RIVER, Mountains, Berlin, 2022
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Installation view, Olivia Parkes, THE SAME RIVER, Mountains, Berlin, 2022
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Installation view, Olivia Parkes, THE SAME RIVER, Mountains, Berlin, 2022
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Installation view, Olivia Parkes, THE SAME RIVER, Mountains, Berlin, 2022
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Installation view, Olivia Parkes, THE SAME RIVER, Mountains, Berlin, 2022
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Installation view, Olivia Parkes, THE SAME RIVER, Mountains, Berlin, 2022
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Installation view, Olivia Parkes, THE SAME RIVER, Mountains, Berlin, 2022
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, Looking Glass, 2022 – Oil on rag board, 73 x 103.5 x 2.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, Last Chance, 2021 – Oil on rag board, 103.5 x 76.8 x 2.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, Afternoon Moon, 2021 – Oil on hardboard, 72.5 x 54.5 x 2.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, Living Like the Rose, 2022 – Oil on wood, 70.5 x 43.5 x 0.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, Crossing, 2022 – Oil on cardboard, 73.3 x 56 x 0.5 cm
Olivia Parkes, Night Fall, 2021 – Oil on rag board, 52.8 x 79 x 2.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, My Father’s House, 2022 – Oil on rag board, 87.6 x 66.4 x 2.5 cm
Olivia Parkes, Interlude, 2022 – Oil on rag board, 62.6 x 103.3 x 2.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, Lay your Shadow at my Feet, 2021 – Oil on rag board, 52.8 x 71.5 x 2.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, The same River, 2021 – Oil on rag board, 52.5 x 77.5 x 2.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, Flock, 2022 – Oil on hardboard, 74.5 x 6.5 x 3.5 cm
<br />
<b>Warning</b>:  Illegal string offset 'alt' in <b>/homepages/8/d512831531/htdocs/KubaParis/wp-content/themes/kubaparis-theme/single.php</b> on line <b>130</b><br />
h
Olivia Parkes, Vanity, 2021 – Oil on hardboard, 83.7 x 102.2 x 2.5 cm

THE SAME RIVER

Akinetopsia is a rare neuropsychological disorder by which a person loses the ability to detect movement. It is also sometimes called “motion blindness.” Perhaps you are pouring a cup of tea, but because you perceive the stream that issues from the spout as static, the cup overflows, spills over, and tea drips to the floor. Or perhaps you are looking at a body of water that, though rippled, appears unmoving, and so you do what Heraclitus said no man could ever do, and step in the same river twice.

Olivia Parkes’s paintings induce a kind of motion blindness. Birds fly across the sky only because you know that they must, that there are no hooks in the clouds by which they hang suspended. Movement is cerebral, these pictures intense, like smells that should evaporate but linger. There is a different type of temporality at play here, where roads loop eternal, and it is always all times of day. In Interlude (2022), the central figure in a crowd looks out with immense saucer eyes. Over his shoulder looms another, larger face—is it the same figure, approaching from behind? Movement is exchanged for difference produced through layering and scale. The effect is an intensification of reality that reveals its instability.

When Heraclitus said that no man could ever step in the same river twice, he meant it two ways: first, that because the river always flows, it is never the same, and second, that since time, too, is a kind of stream, neither are you. I first encountered the notion of akinetopsia in an essay by the poet Denise Riley, in which she describes a state of deep grief as “time lived without its flow.” There is a way of connecting Parkes’s imagery to grief—how it traps and makes experience gigantic and strange. Living through this state, Riley realized that time was not, as people tended to think, “a clear stream, some neutral liquid, nothing finely transcendent,” rather: “it had always been thick.” Maybe akinetopsia is no sickness but the experience of the disconcerting truth that change does not occur by movement but accumulation, and time is not a matter of progression but saturation. This is not to say that Heraclitus was wrong, but that rivers are unruly in more ways than one.

Killing Time (2021) shows a woman smoking a cigarette—like Interlude, the scene is arrested by an uneasy quiet. These two paintings mark breaks in a narrative that is implied across the works but never quite actualized. Rolling hills and winding roads, we assume, must lead somewhere, but in Parkes’s paintings, action, like movement, is suspended: we know it is there, but we do not see it happen. Instead, it remains as a resonance, a vibratory visual effect. In The Color of Time, Eleonora Marangoni describes Marcel Proust’s classic novel as “a work about Time, in which the past and future are represented as ‘colorless rivers’ and only the present is colorful and dense.” Likewise, past and future are outside of Parkes’s frame, while inside is a quivering, luminous, even shrill present, claustrophobic in its relentlessness. The artist’s palette is hyperreal, saturated, uncanny. Her colors are turned up like the volume on a stereo, or, as she herself has said, tightened like a screw.

In Proust, the color and density of the present is extracted from a self-consciously imaginary past. In Parkes’s pictures, however, the narrator seems to have no memory at all, and herein lies the source of their tension. Look into the eyes of the rabbit in Stealth (2021) and the hills that swirl around it become a dream, just as the fixed, blue eyes in the review mirror of The Hunt (2021) seem unsure if they are hunting or being hunted. This sense of a narrative amputated, condensed to an intense instant, where cause becomes indistinguishable from effect, throws the ball back to the viewer. These paintings pour a steady stream of questions, and you, in your motion blindness—all you can do is watch the image overflow.

Kristian Vistrup Madsen, 2022

THE SAME RIVER

Akinetopsie ist eine seltene neuropsychologische Störung, bei der man die Fähigkeit verliert, Bewegungen wahrzunehmen. Sie wird manchmal auch als „Bewegungsblindheit“ bezeichnet. Nehmen wir an, Du gießt Dir eine Tasse Tee ein, aber weil Du den Strahl, der sich aus der Kanne ergießt, als statisch wahrgenommen hast, läuft die Tasse voll, der Tee schwappt über und beginnt auf den Boden zu tropfen. Oder stell Dir vor, Du blickst auf eine Wasseroberfläche, die sich nicht zu bewegen scheint, obwohl sich deren Oberfläche kräuselt – und Du dann doch genau das tust, von dem Heraklit meinte, dass es kein Mensch kann, nämlich zweimal in denselben Fluss steigen.

Die Bilder von Olivia Parkes lösen eine Art Bewegungsblindheit aus. Vögel fliegen über den Himmel, weil man weiss, dass sie nicht anders können, dass es eben keine Haken in den Wolken gibt, an denen sie aufgehängt sind. Die dargestellte Bewegung ist gebunden an den Verstand, die Bilder intensiv, wie Gerüche, die eigentlich verfliegen müssten, und dennoch verweilen. Es scheint hier eine andere Art von Zeitlichkeit am Werk, wo Straßen sich in Endlosschleifen winden und wo alle Tageszeiten gleichzeitig herrschen. In Interlude (2022) blickt die zentrale Figur mit riesigen Kulleraugen aus einer Menschenmenge hervor. Hinter deren Schulter erhebt sich ein weiteres, größeres Gesicht — ist es dieselbe Gestalt, die sich von hinten nähert? Die Darstellung von Bewegung wird hier vertauscht mit dem Eindruck einer seltsamen Differenz, die durch Schichtung und Maßstab hervorgerufen wird. Der Effekt ist der einer übersteigerten Realität, die ihre eigene Instabilität offenlegt.

Als Heraklit sagte, dass kein Mensch zweimal in denselben Fluss steigen kann, meinte er zweierlei: Erstens ist der Fluss, der fortwährend fließt, nie derselbe; und zweitens bleibt man in der Zeit, die selbst ja eine Art Strom ist, nie gleich. Der Begriff der Akinetopsie begegnete mir zum ersten Mal in einem Aufsatz der Dichterin Denise Riley, in dem sie den Zustand tiefer Trauer als „Zeit, die ohne ihren Fluss gelebt wird“ beschreibt. Man kann Parkes‘ Bildsprache mit Trauer in Verbindung bringen – sie hält einen gefangen und läßt alles übergroß und verstörend erscheinen. Riley, die diesen Zustand durchlebte, erkannte, dass die Zeit keineswegs, wie allgemein angenommen, „ein klarer Strom, eine neutrale Flüssigkeit, nichts zart Transzendentes“ sei, sondern vielmehr „schon immer zäh und trüb gewesen ist“. Vielleicht ist Akinetopsie keine Krankheit, sondern die Erfahrung einer beunruhigenden Wahrheit: Dass Veränderung nicht durch Bewegung, sondern durch Verdichtung entsteht und dass Zeit keine Frage des Verlaufs, sondern der Sättigung ist. Das soll nicht heißen, dass Heraklit einer Täuschung aufsaß, sondern vielmehr, dass Flüsse in mehr als einer Hinsicht widerspenstig sind.

Killing Time (2021) zeigt eine Frau, die eine Zigarette raucht – wie in Interlude ist die Szene in beklemmender Stille befangen. Diese beiden Gemälde markieren Brüche in Erzählungen, die in den Werken zwar angedeutet, aber nie vollends greifbar werden. Sanfte Hügel und kurvenreiche Straßen, so nehmen wir an, müssten irgendwo hin führen, aber in Parkes‘ Gemälden bleibt die Aktion, so wie die Bewegung, in der Schwebe: Wir wissen um ihr Vorhandensein, aber wir sehen sie sich nicht vollziehen. Stattdessen bleibt eine Art Resonanz, ein Effekt visueller Schwingung. In I colori del tempo (Die Farben der Zeit) beschreibt Eleonora Marangoni Marcel Prousts Romanklassiker als „ein Werk über die Zeit, in dem Vergangenheit und Zukunft als ‚farblose Flüsse‘ dargestellt werden und nur die Gegenwart bunt und dicht wirkt“. Ähnlich liegen Vergangenheit und Zukunft jenseits der Rahmen der Bilder von Parkes, während darin eine zitternde, leuchtende, gar schrille Gegenwart waltet, klaustrophobisch in ihrer Unerbittlichkeit. Die Palette der Künstlerin ist hyperreal, gesättigt, unheimlich. Ihre Farben sind aufgedreht wie die Lautstärke einer Stereoanlage oder, wie sie selbst sagt, festgezogen wie eine Schraube.

Bei Proust werden Farbigkeit und Intensität der Gegenwart aus einer ganz bewußt von Vorstellungen geprägten Idee der Vergangenheit geschöpft. In Parkes‘ Bildern jedoch scheint die Erzählerin über gar keine Erinnerung zu verfügen, und darin liegt die Quelle von deren Spannung: wenn man dem Kaninchen in Stealth (2021) in die Augen schaut und die es umzüngelnden Hügel zu einem Traum gerinnen, oder wenn die starren, blauen Augen im Rückspiegel von The Hunt (2021) nicht sicher festmachen lassen, ob sie einer Jägerin oder einer Gejagten gehören. Dieses Gefühl einer amputierten Erzählung, verdichtet zu einem intensiven Moment, in dem Ursache und Wirkung nicht mehr zu unterscheiden sind, spielt den Ball zurück zu uns Betrachtenden. Diese Gemälde werfen einen stetigen Fluss von Fragen auf und Du – in Deiner Bewegungsblindheit – kannst nur zuschauen, wie das Bild überläuft.

Kristian Vistrup Madsen, 2022